Low Poly Fox

A low-poly rendering of a fox, made from laser cut wood

diy

laser cutting

wood working

Intro

As a frequenter of r/diy I have seen several submissions of wooden low poly art. Low poly art is a class of artwork that renders real life images (usually of nature or animals) as a collection of distinct polygons and complementary colors. One day I found this low poly rendering of a fox, and convinced myself that I had to take a stab at creating a wooden version of it.

Project Overview

This is the outline for the project

1. Create an outline of the fox in Inkscape.

2. Use the outline to laser cut the fox out of wood.

3. Paint the wood to match the digital image. %p.project-numbered-list 4. Build a wooden background and stain it white.

5. Glue the fox onto the wood background.

Step 1: Vectorize

I first loaded up this image into Inkscape, a photo editing software. I proceeded to outline all the polygons using the pencil tool. I also added numbers to each tile. This will prove to be very useful later on.

Step 2: Laser Cut

Through my work I have access to a laser cutter for free! I picked up some one dollar scrap wood from Home Depot that worked perfectly for my needs. I cut out the edges of the outline, and etched the numbers into the wood. The numbers made it much easier to re-assemble my fox once I painted it.

Step 3: Painting

This was the most time consuming part of the process. I first did two coats of primer, then one to two coats of paint. I used acrylic primer and paint for this.

Step 4: Wooden Background

I bought a plank of common wood from Home Depot and used a circular saw to cut out three equally sized segments. After some sanding, I proceeded to stain it with a dark walnut, and then multiple coats of white-wash to give it a weathered barn look.

Step 5: Gluing The Fox

When I cut out the fox, I kept the original sheet of wood. I used that piece of wood as a frame to hold the individual tiles together while gluing. I went tile by tile until they were all glued to the background.

Step 6: Profit!

It's all done, and looks better than I had hoped for!